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New Release

Bullen

“While studying the typefaces in the American Type Founders (ATF) catalog from the turn of the 20th century, I got a feeling for the freewheeling eclecticism of the metal typefaces, the mixed and matched glyph features and assembled letters, like their designers were in a candy shop,” Juliet Shen mused. The aptly named Bullen pays homage to Henry Lewis Bullen, printer and librarian at ATF, remembered for his typographic erudition as well as a certain roguishness.

Despite being unabashedly quirky, Bullen is surprisingly comfortable in text, for which it was designed. It has a modest contrast and is vaguely slab-serif, but with jaunty, lightly cupped serifs. Informal design touches give it an inviting, even slightly chatty personality. It has a decidedly American flavor and was designed to complement American Gothics (Benton Sans was one model gothic face it was designed to pair with). The italics have their own independence, an entirely new design with distinctive appeal.

4 Styles: Regular, Italic, Bold, and Bold Italic
Bullen is available as OpenType fonts with tabular figures, arbitrary fractions, and extended language support.

More Bullen: http://www.fontbureau.com/fonts/Bullen/

NEWS & NOTEWORTHY

 

Fonts In Use Launched

An initiative of Sam Berlow, Nick Sherman, and Stephen Coles, Fonts In Use catalogs and examines real-world typography wherever it appears — branding, advertising, signage, packaging, publications, in print and online — with an emphasis on the typefaces used. They’ve started an expert selection of blog posts, including those from magazine designer Marc Oxborrow and instructor and historian Indra Kupferschmid. The type community has been set abuzz.

More: http://fontsinuse.com/

 

Mike Parker’s Story of Type: Van den Keere

In this seventh installment the focus is on Hendrik van den Keere, the 16th-century Flemish punchcutter. Little could he have known that 400 years later a revival of his roman types would become the most widely used font for newspapers: Poynter Oldstyle, part of Font Bureau’s Readability Series.

Read: http://type101.fontbureau.com/parker-type-history-7/

 © 2011 The Font Bureau, Inc.