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NEWS, TYPE DESIGN · November 4, 2010

iLT: Reviving Caslon

Part 2: Readability, Affability, Authority

On the i love typography blog, William Berkson, designer of Williams Caslon Text, posts part two of Reviving Caslon. He begins, “When their words are put into print, writers want the text to be inviting and welcoming, so that readers will read what they have written. And they also want the text to have an aura of credibility, so it will be taken seriously and maybe even accepted.” Read more...

[read Part 1: The Snare of Authenticity]

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SKETCHES · November 4, 2010

just my type

A limited edition poster by Cyrus Highsmith.

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SEEN AND NOTED · November 2, 2010

2010 Election Typography

Obama is a central focus in this midterm election. Candidates associate themselves with the President or oppose him. So I would have thought the visual identity choices would reflect this relationship. Not so much.

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BEHIND THE SCENES · October 25, 2010

TypeCon Letter-Drawing Collage

Draw a letter, any letter! And so you did. We thank all of you at TypeCon who stepped up to our exhibit table in Los Angeles and participated in our letter-drawing collage.

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BEHIND THE SCENES, INTERVIEWS · October 13, 2010

Louise Paradis’s Revival of Recta

It’s rare for Font Bureau to have an intern, but for three weeks we were delighted to have Louise Paradis intern with us in our Boston studio. She hails from Montreal, worked in Los Angeles for a time, and is now a graduate student in art direction at ECAL, Ecole cantonale d’art de Lausanne (University of Art and Design Lausanne) in Switzerland. I had a chance to talk with her before she left.

MLM: What led you to Font Bureau?
LP: Well, one project for a class of mine was by my professor François Rappo. He required us ...

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PARKER TYPE HISTORY · October 13, 2010

Mike Parker’s Story of Type: Nicholas Jenson

The beginning of Chapter II is the fourth installment of Mike Parker’s Story of Type. Old style roman and italic typefaces are introduced, where capitals modeled after ancient Italian incised inscriptions are combined with a lowercase modeled on the forms of the Carolingian minuscule. The time period spans from the mid 15th century to the early 19th century and focuses on punchcutters of Italian, French, Dutch, British, and Hungarian origin.

II. Old Style Roman and Italic Typefaces

Nicholas Jenson (French, 1420–1480)

In Venice, the first great cultural center of the developing Renaissance, the blackletter used by the mediaeval ...

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SKETCHES · October 12, 2010

history

A very brief animated version history of the book, more or less.

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NEWS, TYPE DESIGN · October 6, 2010

Slab Happy: Trilby Reviewed by Paul Shaw

Paul Shaw reviews Trilby in an article for Print magazine. “Although the sans serif was originally a bastard offspring of the slab serif, the latter has been copying the former for the past 80 years, and Trilby by David Jonathan Ross continues this trend.” Read more...


NEWS, TYPE DESIGN · October 1, 2010

the smell of books

The following is the text from the presentation I gave at Matthew Carter’s AIGA Boston Fellows Award ceremony on September 24, 2010.

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NEWS · September 28, 2010

Matthew Carter Among the 2010 MacArthur Fellows

Accolades again to Matthew Carter! On the heels of receiving the AIGA Boston Fellows Award, he is among 22 others selected for the 2010 MacArthur Fellows, often referred to as the “genius award.” This year includes an impressive line up of recipients working across a broad spectrum of endeavors. Read more here about “a type designer crafting letterforms of unequaled elegance and precision that span the migration of text from the printed page to computer screens.”